The Early Years

The establishment of Offa Grammar School and the subsequent steady developments can be credited to the thoughtfulness, resourcefulness and the relentless efforts of the Offa Descendants’ Union (ODU). In those days of the colonial era, Offa was small, and could almost pass for a rural town except for the presence of the Nigerian Railway Corporation and some Missionary churches with their primary schools. The idea of starting a Community Secondary School in that part of the country was therefore a rather novel experience.

The establishment of Offa Grammar School and the subsequent steady developments can be credited to the thoughtfulness, resourcefulness and the relentless efforts of the Offa Descendants’ Union (ODU). In those days of the colonial era, Offa was small, and could almost pass for a rural town except for the presence of the Nigerian Railway Corporation and some Missionary churches with their primary schools. The idea of starting a Community Secondary School in that part of the country was therefore a rather novel experience.

Between 1935 and 1938 Offa indigenes in Lagos formed a socio-cultural body which later transformed into ODU. This became the mouthpiece and often the motivating soul of the enthusiastic people of Offa. In 1940, a successful and epoch making Education Week organised to raise fund for a Community-owned Secondary School in Offa led to the constitution of a working committee, which became the engine room of the efforts that brought the dream to fruition. Therefore when the school commenced in 1943, it was not surprising that the committee transformed into its first Board of Governors.

Inaugural Board of Governors

The committee was headed by Reverend RN Ludlow(a Methodist Missionary) and had as members
  • Mr JA Oyeleke, Mr JOS Onawola
  • Mr John Oyediran
  • Alhaji Sanni Giwa
  • Alhaji Gbadamosi Ijaiya
  • Mr Samuel Adesiyun
  • Alhaji Bello Jatto
  • Mr John Opaleke
  • Alhaji Aliu Latinwo and
  • Mr David Ogunwumi.

Inaugural Premise

The Iyeru-Okin African Church building and premises came in handy for use of the young school, and the initial instructional materials were provided for from the generosity of the trader-members of ODU. School furniture, uniform and logo and motto were in no time designed, and on the morning of February 2, 1943 the School was formally declared open with only a handful of 8 students reporting. The number swelled by 10 before the end of that year.

Foundation Students

The eighteen foundation students were:
  • Johnson Adegoke
  • Bamidele Fafemi
  • Olagunju Kolawole
  • Olarinoye Omirinde
  • Olagunju Ajiboye
  • Salami Olatunde
  • Salau Olatunde
  • Albert Adetoro
  • Jimoh Oyawoye
  • Joseph Asa
  • Godwin Johnson
  • Emmanuel Jenyo
  • Samuel Ogunsola
  • Samuel Odewole
  • Jacob Banwo
  • Mustapha Awoyemi
  • Muritala Olatunde and
  • Peter Alabi.
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